See You Sunday! Blog Talk with Kymberlie Ingalls

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Learn How to Present Yourself

 

–David Baker on Kymberlie Ingalls, excerpted from Write Angles

 

Literary agents want to hear about our platform and expect to be directed to our blog. Should we conceive of one presenting the electrifying premise of our work, excerpts that stimulate the reader’s curiosity, and laudatory comments submitted by reviewers? Yes, but Kymberlie Ingalls can help us do much more.

Ingalls, our featured speaker for the January 19 meeting, is a writer, freelance editor, and class instructor who has been blogging since 1997. She currently has several sites in operation. One of them includes a section titled “My Former Self,” in which she recalls starting out as a disk jockey during her brief career in radio: “So many switches” on the mixing board—“big ones that lit up bright orange, small metal ones that did who the hell knows what.” Only a few seconds left until. . . “I had to say something into that bulky microphone that would be heard by thousands of listeners. Crap was all I could think. The song was wailing to a close. Oh man! I’m up! Is this the right switch? Ah, hell, here goes nothing!”

Obviously, Ingalls knows how to build tension. A literary agent would also see that she knows what she’s writing about and takes her work seriously. After reading her concluding promise to “make those rock ‘n’ roll fantasies come true,” the agent would sense as well that Ingalls loves music and treasures the connection between the DJ and the listener.

Introducing a different blog, “Stories in the Key of Me,” she writes: “This is my playground, where I get to frolic with language, tease with words,

and flirt with the reader’s mind in the form of memoir, prose, and flash fiction.” In another, “Neuroticy = Societal Madness,” Ingalls takes aim at hypocrisy in present-day America. Her “Bay Area Collective” is a venue for local events, news, and stories that interest her.

What does it all add up to? Not only agents but potential readers want to know who we are as writers. At the January meeting, we’ll find out how to present ourselves.

The location of the talk is the Oakland Public Library (enter on Madison Street); see flyer for meeting schedule.

“Blogging & Branding — Why Aren’t You?” with Kymberlie Ingalls, Sunday, January 19, 2014

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Yes, an author’s work should speak for itself, but authors are as important a character as any we create. In today’s pop culture, people want to know more about the artist behind the work. If you want your work to be seen by a larger audience, making a splash is essential, and being personable is key. Blogging has become such a widespread trend that it’s hard to find a starting place. Once you do, driving traffic there is even harder. We’ll talk about creative ways to make your site one readers will want to find.

Kymberlie Ingalls has a long history with words. She earned her comedic chops at a young age by putting characters in precarious situations. From there she found herself desperately scribbling poems filled with angst. Thinking everything had to have structure, she floundered, trying to squeeze her chaotic life into that box.

At the age of 16 Kymberlie won entry to a workshop with an award-winning poet and found her freedom. Writing became more reason than rhyme, but it wasn’t her passion. Acting, comedy, and radio broadcasting all called to her, but eventually she came back to the written word.

With her first blog appearing in 1997, she garnered a small following. Kymberlie moved into the exciting arena of short-track stock car racing in 2003, creating a highly successful community website uniting fans with drivers. Her current network of blogs began in 2009, featuring personal essay, memoir, opinion, and short fiction. She writes on themes of love, loss, humanity, and her struggles with amnesia, all from her little corner of the world. A memoir novel is in progress.

Kymberlie is also a freelance editor, personal writing coach, and class instructor.

The location of the talk is the Oakland Public Library (enter on Madison Street); see flyer for meeting schedule.