April 15th: The Art of Giving Live Readings with Amos White

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Amos White will be speaking at our April event

amos-white-thumb.jpgAMOS WHITE, Haiku poet, author and speaker
on The Art of Giving Live Readings

Sunday, April 15
1204 Preservation Parkway,
Oakland, CA 94612

Come hear this engaging and educational speaker to learn how the subtleties of tone and time can move an audience with but a word.

At the presentation you will learn:
* How to perform like a pro
* How to find open mics readings
* The dos & don’ts of reading etiquette
* How to host your own local literary readings

Bring a small poem or a written paragraph of fiction, nonfiction, etc. to practice reading aloud.

About Our Featured Guest, Amos White

Amos White is an awarded American haiku poet and author, producer and activist, recognized for his vivid literary imagery and breathless poetic interpretations. Amos is published in several national and international reviews and anthologies. He is Founder and Host of the Heart of the Muse creative’s salon, Executive Producer and Host of Beyond Words: Jazz+Poetry show; Producer of the Oakland Haiku and Poetry Festival; President of Bay Area Generations literary reading series.

Learn more about Amos White at: about.me/amoswhite or follow him on Facebook.

 

But Wait, There’s More!

Get Marketing Support, Get Your Craft Questions Answered, and Network with Other Writers…

Be sure to arrive early to participate in the Craft and Marketing groups. These are interactive conversations where you can talk to other writers to resolve the issues in your writing and your writers career. Make the commitment to be join us every third Sunday; your writing career is important and you deserve this.

MEETING SCHEDULE

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group
2:00–2:30 – Break, Book Sale
2:30–3:00 – Announcements

Featured Speakers

3:00–3:15 – CWC Featured member Fred Dodsworth
3:15–4:00 – Featured Speaker Amos White

Meetings are $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

Our meetings are right off 980 in downtown Oakland, at beautiful Preservation Park. Just off 12th Street, naturally you can get there from the 12th St. BART station. Those with limited ability can use the parking lot off of MLK Way; otherwise there should be plenty of FREE parking within the park and on surrounding streets.

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Welcome to The Club!

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CWCLogowithR

The Berkeley Branch is the founding branch of the oldest professional writers’ club West of the Missisippi.

CWC Berkeley Branch welcomes all California Writers Club members and guests to our monthly speaker program and affordable workshops on the art and business of writing.

Join us May 20th at 2pm at Preservation Park for

The Road to Redemption

with Joe Clifford

Click here to commit to your writing career.

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Save the date for our April 15th Event on Giving Live Readings

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Amos White will be speaking at our April event

For poetry month we welcome Amos White to speak to the Berkeley CWC on joining and succeeding at giving public readings. Amos White will share with us tips on securing public readings, as well as how to make a big splash once you walk on stage.

If you’ve ever met Amos White, you’ll know why we asked him to speak for poetry month. He’s active in the Bay Area literary scene, and he’s a charming guy who lights up the room. Don’t know Mr. White? Come join us this April and find out how you to can become the kind of reader who owns the stage and the room. As usual, we’ll also have support groups to discuss craft and marketing issues. Snacks, coffee, and plenty of networking opportunities at every meeting.

Our meetings are the third Sunday of every month, so mark your calendar for April 15th. If you use Google Calendar, you can subscribe to our calendar so you get notifications for every meeting. Our meetings are at Preservation Park, from 12-4. More info to come!

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See You Sunday! Bookstore Owners Panel

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No one knows the book biz like the people who handle books every day. Come and hear what local bookstore owners have to say about their life behind the counter, in the stacks, reading the industry rags and catalogs catalogs catalogs. How does YOUR book fit in to the bookstore universe? Bring questions and be prepared to take lots of notes! Now here’s President Kristen’s column from this month’s newsletter….

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The Wind in Your Sails

Some words from your president

One of my happiest moments as a writer was my first book launch at Laurel Bookstore. There were so many lumps and bumps to the process, but Luan was so encouraging. “Fun will not be denied,” she declared! I learned so much from her, and continue to learn. Now you can, too!

Instead of having one speaker at our March 18th meeting, we’ll have three local bookstore owners. Our speaker chair, Kymberlie Ingalls, will be moderating a conversation between Luan Stauss of Laurel Bookstore, Kathleen Caldwell of A Great Good Place for Books, and Bob Fisher of Walden Pond.  All of these beloved business leaders are incredibly supportive of local authors!

We’ll be talking about their roles as bookstore owners/buyers, and their relationship with authors. They will offer tips and advice for writers who wish to cultivate a relationship with a bookstore, how they deal with Amazon authors, and much more.

Then mark your calendars for Saturday, June 16th, when all of our club authors will celebrate recently published titles at our end-of-year party at Laurel Bookstore!

Between now and then, we will continue to grow our club in leaps and bounds. (Did you know we started the year with 60 members and now have 90?) It’s time to select the new leaders who will help our branch work smoothly and happily next year. What are your skills and how can they help the club? What would you like to learn? Hosting events? Talking to people? Are you any good at writing? There are lots of jobs for that! Contact Nomination Committee chair Christine Volker for information.

Sail On,

Kristen Caven

Kristen at the Helm… hang on!

 

March 18th: Bookstore Owners Panel Discussion

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Mini flyer for March 18th event: Get your book into book stores, learn about this and more at our Book Store Owners Panel.

Save the Date, This is an Event You Won’t Want to Miss

No matter what kind of writing you do, you want to be in bookstores. But how do the buyers for those book stores decide what to carry? There are 100,000 new books published every year, that’s an enormous amount of competition for a limited amount of shelf space.

Did  you know that stores like Barnes and Noble charge a fee to be featured on a table, or even to have your book facing out on the shelf? Learn how Indie bookstore owners do it better at our March meeting. How do you get into the local authors shelf? What sorts of things are book buyers looking for? These questions and more will be addressed at our monthly meeting on March 18th at Preservation Park.

The Panel Discussion begins at 2:45, but come at noon to take advantage of our group discussions,and networking. Improve your craft at 12 and marketing at 1pm, and fill up on coffee, snacks and good conversation before our announcements at 2:30.

Get Marketing Support, Get Your Craft Questions Answered, and Network with Other Writers…

Be sure to arrive early to participate in the Craft and Marketing groups. These are interactive conversations where you can talk to other writers to resolve the issues in your writing and your writers career. Make the commitment to be join us every third Sunday; your writing career is important and you deserve this.

Preservation Park

Preservation Park, where Jacqueline Luckett will speak this Sunday

MEETING SCHEDULE

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group
2:00–2:30 – Break, Book Sale
2:30–2:45 – Announcements

Featured Event

~no featured author this month~
2:45–4:00 – Featured speaker panel with Bookstore Buyers

Meetings are $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

Our meetings are right off 980 in downtown Oakland, at beautiful Preservation Park. Just off 12th Street, naturally you can get there from the 12th St. BART station. Those with limited ability can use the parking lot off of MLK Way; otherwise there should be plenty of FREE parking within the park and on surrounding streets.

 

 

An Interview with Sunday’s Speaker, Jacqueline Luckett

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Jacqueline LuckettJacqueline Luckett Gives Us a Preview on Writing Great Characters Grounded in Reality

This Sunday in Preservation Park, Jacqueline Luckett will speak to the club on writing stronger characters. Luckett’s two novels are Passing Love and Searching for Tina Turner, and she writes essays in the Huffington Post and Best Women’s Travel Writing 2011.

CWC member and journalist Cristina Deptula asked her some questions so we can get to know her better.

CD: You talked about living authentically in an old blog post on your website, about having personal values even if you don’t consciously think about them a lot. Did developing and articulating your own values help you do the same for your characters, or vice versa?

JL: My characters are people with values, that may or may not parallel my own. I try to include characters, male and female, with values and action that are the opposite of my own.

CD: What are some examples of grounded, developed characters in contemporary or classic fiction?

JL: Pecola, in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye believes that having blue eyes will make her happy. Every action she takes grounds her to this belief. Lotto and Mathilde, husband and wife in Lauren Groff’s Fates and Furies, steadfastly hold on to their perceptions of themselves and each other. My own character, Ruby, in Passing Love, believes her life will be better in Paris, no matter the personal cost. She’s dogged, persistent, and focused.

Every action these characters take is a result of his/her character development, physically and emotionally.

CD: How can you learn to write about a character unlike yourself without falling into stereotypes?

I took a class from Junot Diaz years ago. He suggested trying to write yourself as a character with a scar or disfiguration. How that character approaches the world will create a new character different from self.

I’m a black woman over fifty. Does that mean that I can only write characters who are black women over 50? Of course, not. It’s our job as writers to observe, to dig into our memories and to write past the first idea that comes to mind. That’s where being a great observer of people comes in. If your mother called father to dinner many times before he finally came to the table, what does this characteristic say about your mother? How does the father’s response distinguish him? The traits aren’t gender specific. They’re great traits that distinguish and deepen a character. We can twist those traits into characteristics that, alone or in combination, can avoid stereotyping. Mix things up.

Preservation Park

Preservation Park, where Jacqueline Luckett will speak this Sunday

CD: Does every characteristic you give a character have to relate somehow to the plot, or can it work to develop a character just for the sake of having them be more well rounded or letting the readers get to know them better?

Not necessarily. Just as in life, we run into people who are interesting, but irrelevant to whatever we’re doing at the moment, so too are incidental characters in a story who pop up on a protagonist’s journey. They hold our interest, enliven our stories, and create a three-dimensional world.

Right now, I’m reading Since We Fell by Dennis Lehane. In a party scene, he lists the names of five or six attendees who may be important to the main character’s enjoyment of the celebration. We only know their names. The guests blend together and probably won’t be seen again. There’s one character, in the scene a woman, who’s described in a couple of sentences. She holds a baby on her hip, she’s striking, and, the characteristic that really stands out for me, she struggles with her newly adopted English language. This character stands out.

CD: I’ve heard talks on how to create unique and individual characters before. Is creating a character who’s grounded in reality kind of the same idea? Will a character who’s grounded in the reality of an actual and realistic person be more likely to be interesting?

Not if the actual person isn’t interesting. Even if they’re real, a writer may have to give him/her characteristics to make them engaging, appealing and give readers a reason to stick with a story.

When I speak of characters grounded in reality, I don’t mean the everyday reality of incidents. I’m talking about characteristics that make people real and credible: a person who itches all the time, a man who sings in the BART station but nowhere else, a person who cannot look another in the eye, someone who voices the same complaint every day of her life.


Jacqueline Luckett has an MFA in Screenwriting from the University of California, Riverside. Luckett frequently speaks to various organizations about discovering her passion, her path to successful publication, and advice for new writers seeking to move forward in their careers. The Bay Area native lives in Oakland and travels frequently to nurture her passion for photography, exotic foods, and in search of another city that mesmerizes her as much as Paris. Learn more about her at JacquelineLuckett.com, or come to this Sunday’s meeting.

Luckett is the highlight of our schedule, but be sure to get to the meeting early to take advantage of our group discussions on craft and marketing. Coffee and snacks are included.

See the full schedule for Sunday’s meeting here.

Feb 18th: “Grounding Our Characters to the Real World” with Jacqueline Luckett

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Our members have told us that want more opportunities to improve their craft, and we listened. on Sunday, February 18th, novelist Jacqueline Luckett will help us improve our character writing in her feature lecture, “Grounding Our Characters to the Real World.”

In the real world, we’re eager to learn as much as we can about the new people we meet. Readers should experience that same excitement when they’re introduced to a novel’s characters. At February’s meeting, we’ll look at a few ideas to keep readers interested and engaged in a character from the first pages of a novel to the last.

About the February Speaker

Jacqueline Luckett is the author of two novels, Passing Love (2012) and Searching for Tina Turner (2010), and essays in the Huffington Post and Best Women’s Travel Writing 2011. She has an MFA in Screenwriting from the University of California, Riverside. Luckett frequently speaks to various organizations about discovering her passion, her path to successful publication, and advice for new writers seeking to move forward in their careers. The Bay Area native lives in Oakland and travels frequently to nurture her passion for photography, exotic foods, and in search of another city that mesmerizes her as much as Paris. Learn more about her at jacquelineluckett.com.

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Get Marketing Support, Get Your Craft Questions Answered, and Network with Other Writers…

Be sure to arrive early to participate in the Craft and Marketing groups. These are interactive conversations where you can talk to other writers to resolve the issues in your writing and your writers career. Make the commitment to be join us every third Sunday; your writing career is important and you deserve this.

MEETING SCHEDULE

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

CWC Featured Author Francine Thomas Howard

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group
2:00–2:30 – Break, Book Sale
2:30–3:00 – Announcements

Featured Speakers

3:00–3:15 – CWC Featured member Francine Thomas Howard
3:15–4:00 – Featured Speaker Jacqueline Luckett

Meetings are $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

Our meetings are right off 980 in downtown Oakland, at beautiful Preservation Park. Just off 12th Street, naturally you can get there from the 12th St. BART station. Those with limited ability can use the parking lot off of MLK Way; otherwise there should be plenty of FREE parking within the park and on surrounding streets.

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