California Writers Week 10/15-10/21

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WHEREAS, The California Writers Club was founded in 1909, with Jack London, Ina Coolbrith, George Sterling and others as members; and

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WHEREAS, California’s literary tradition dates back to the works of Mark Twain, Bret Harte, Mary Austin, Nobel prize and Pulitzer prize winner John Steinbeck, Delilah L. Beasley, Joaquin Miller, Dashiell Hammett, Raymond Barrio, Gertrude Atherton, Raymond Chandler, Pulitzer prize winner William Saroyan and a great many others, and

WHEREAS, The California Writers Club honors all California writers, past and present, and continues to nurture the talents of new writers as well as established authors, and to provide a forum for the sharing of their writing experience, and

WHEREAS, The California Writers Club’s mission is to teach, mentor and encourage all writers for the good of our society; and

WHEREAS, California libraries are the forum where the writing of Californians is preserved and provided to the public, and

WHEREAS, the California Writers Club encourages all California libraries to showcase the works of California writers through displays, author programs and reading clubs; and

WHEREAS, The California Writers Club urges all educational institutions to place more emphasis on developing the writing and reading skills of everyone; and

WHEREAS, The California Writers Club is observing the third week in October as California Writers Week; now, therefore, be it

RESOLVED BY ASSEMBLY MEMBERS TIM LESLIE, JOSEPH CANCIAMILLA, GUY S. HOUSTON, BILL MAZE, GENE MULLIN, JOE NATION, AND PATRICIA WIGGINS AND PRESIDENT PRO TEMPORE OF THE SENATE JOH

N L. BURTON AND SENATORS NELL SOTO AND JACKIE SPEIER, That they recognize the third week in October as California Writers Week, and encourage the people of the State of California to reflect upon the contributions that California writers have made to humankind.

Members Resolution No. 2170.     Dated this 4th day of September, 2003.

See more information and signatures

 

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An Interview with Sunday’s Speaker: Laurie Ann Doyle, Dialogue and You

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We caught up with Laurie Ann Doyle before she speaks for the club this Sunday. At our monthly meeting, she’ll be talking all about writing better dialogue. Doyle knows her stuff: she’s been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and won the Alligator Juniper National Fiction Award. Her work has been published in The Los Angeles Review, Timber, Jabberwock Review, Road Story, Arroyo Literary Review, Under the Sun Magazine, and many other journals. She teaches creative writing at the San Francisco Writers Grotto and UC Berkeley Extension, where she received the Honored Instructor award. Learn more at her site, LaurieAnnDoyle.com.

We hope you will bring all pressing craft questions to this Sunday’s meeting. Until then, our social media chair Cristina Deptula asked her some questions.


Cristina Deptula: I see your new book, World Gone Missing, is a collection of stories about people who go missing, or disappear from our lives, in one way or another. How did you select that theme?

The truth is I didn’t select that theme as much as it picked me. Before I had even a thought of a book in my brain, my brother-in-law went missing. Decades later, sadly he still hasn’t reappeared. Though the opening story in World Gone Missing—“Bigger Than Life”—has a similar through-line, I completely fictionalized the characters and specific plot points. What remains true to life is the feeling you get when a loved one seems to vanish into thin air. The best way I can describe it is a sinking, helpless sensation. As the years wore on, I began to see my brother-in-law in new ways. I appreciated his subtle kindnesses and sharp wit, along with his sometimes brash and irrational nature. Thought I’m not sure this would have changed anything, I wish I could have been more compassionate.

As I finished the “Bigger Than Life” story and embarked on others, I realized that losing a loved one can trigger many conflicted feelings, and conflict is at the heart of fiction. Sometimes a person’s absence can free up a character to do things they’d never done before, wonderful things. Sometimes they find it almost impossible to move on. This realization got me going and in this book I’ve explored both the loss and liberation that absence can bring. But I had to get a chunk of stories written before that unifying theme floated up.

What makes dialogue good? So many people stumble over their words and not everyone speaks in an interesting way.

I love writing dialogue, and there’s a lot of what I hope is interesting dialogue in World Gone Missing. The tricky thing is that dialogue in fiction and memoir should sound like authentic speech, even though it’s not. Strong dialogue is distilled, rather than transcribed, speech. If you tape record people talking, you’ll hear lots of “filler” words: um, uh, yeah, etc. On the page, this needs to be edited out.

At my October 15 Dialogue Workshop, we’ll talk about the importance of giving the reader only the most dramatic elements of what was said. Usually less is more. Consider keeping your sentences or phrases short. The Russian author Anton Chekhov advised, “A line of dialogue should always leave the sense that more could have been said.” Depending on your character, you don’t have to necessarily be grammatically correct or eloquent. Quirky is great! If within character, use of profanity is also fine.

Consider the difference between “It’s a pleasure to meet you”—vs.—“Hey man, what’s up?” Or “I feel unwell”—vs.—I feel like crap.” Good dialogue accomplishes many things at once; it reveals the character and their relationships, creates tension, advances plot, and modulates the story’s pace.
On fascinating aspect of dialogue is that people often don’t mean what they say, or avoid the “real” subject. Strong dialogue also creates subtext, or the unspoken meaning underneath the words on the pages. Consider what your characters are not saying, where they are not finishing their sentences or falling completely silent. What is the implicit tension, as well as the explicit tension?

If you’re coming to this Sunday’s meeting to meet Laurie Ann Doyle, don’t forget we’re at a new location: Preservation Park.

Your workshop covers dialogue in both fiction and memoir. How do you think the ability to craft good dialogue could benefit the nonfiction author?

Dialogue is every bit as important in memoir as it is in fiction, because it’s vital in creating compelling drama and powerful scenes. In a nonfiction piece, you don’t have to accurately reflect every word that was said. It’s fine to reconstruct the conversation and give us the gist, including the most dramatic elements, as I discuss above. The key is to stay true to the people you are portraying and how they expressed themselves.

If you need more information, consider talking with a relative or friend, or reading old letters. If appropriate, you could even eavesdrop. Base your dialogue on the knowledge of the people you’re portraying. If they swore, include swear words. If they were excessively polite, craft your dialogue to show that. Again, work to stay true to the experience of them and yourself.

On October 15, we’ll go into greater depth on all this, and you’ll have a chance to try out some new dialogue techniques in a free-write exercise yourself.

Join us this Sunday at Preservation Park to meet Laurie Ann Doyle and learn all her tricks for writing terrific dialog.

 

 

 

 

 

See you Sunday at Preservation Park!

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Laurie.porch.color.croppedAward-winning author and creative writing teacher Laurie Ann Doyle will be speaking about the nuances of writing dialogue at our October meeting.

Our meeting will end a little earlier this month, as we have to be out by 4 sharp, but until then it will be a hive of mental activity and conversation about the mysterious work of writing.

Come for the whole meeting or part of it! Cover charge for the whole afternoon is $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group
2:00–2:15 – Break, Book Sale
2:15–2:45 – Business & Announcements
2:45–3:00 – CWC Featured member Karma Bennett reads & introduces…
3:00–3:45 – Featured Speaker Laurie Ann Doyle, Said and Unsaid: Dialogue in Fiction and Memoir.

MEMBERS:
Please Sign up to bring a snack or volunteer – this month, or any month!
Don’t forget to bring a headshot and a book cover. We will decorate the space with US! Always bring books to sell or trade!
Have you renewed your membership? Do it today at this link or bring a check on Sunday.

GUESTS:
Would you like to join the club? We welcome writers of every genre, both published and aspiring, plus industry professionals such as agents, publicists, and editors. Come to the meeting and introduce yourself! You can join at the meeting or online beforehand…just bring your receipt to get the member price.

EVERYONE:
Say you are coming on Meetup!
Get club announcements by clicking the “follow by email” link on the right side of the web page, www.cwc-berkeley.org.

The meeting is at 1204 Preservation Parkway in Downtown Oakland, just a few blocks from BART. We will be meeting downstairs in the Robinson Classrooms. See our website for more details.

Whatever your genre or your project, it’s great to have a community of colleagues. We look forward to seeing you Sunday.

Sail On!

Kristen Caven
www.kristencaven.com

President 2017-2018
berkeley.cwc

CWC-Berkeley.org

 

10/15 SPEAKER— “Said and Unsaid: Dialogue in Fiction and Memoir” with Laurie Ann Doyle

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Preservation Park

Our new locatation: Preservation Park

Is dialogue meant to reveal or conceal?

Strong dialogue in fiction and memoir actually accomplishes both, revealing the characters by what is said and not said. October’s featured speaker Laurie Ann Doyle will share excerpts from masters of dialogue, examining how artfully crafted speech, gesture, and silence helps the writer not only develop character, but generate tension, subtext, and move the plot forward. Participants will learn how to take full advantage of their characters’ expressive tics, favorite phrases, and utter withdrawal to build an immersive world for the reader. They’ll have the chance to free-write some of their own dialogue, trying on different personas, and share what they’ve created in a supportive atmosphere.

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About Laurie Ann Doyle

Laurie Ann Doyle is the author of World Gone Missing, a book of short stories to be released by Regal House Publishing in October, 2017.

The winner of the Alligator Juniper National Fiction Award, her work has been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and published in The Los Angeles Review, Timber, Jabberwock Review, Road Story, Arroyo Literary Review, Under the Sun Magazine, and many other journals. She teaches creative writing at the San Francisco Writers Grotto and UC Berkeley Extension, where she received the Honored Instructor award. Learn more at her site, LaurieAnnDoyle.com.

But That’s Not All!

Get Marketing Support, Get Your Craft Questions Answered, and Network with Other Writers…and Check Out Our New Location in the Heart of Oakland

We are meeting at Preservation Park

Our next meeting will be right off 980 in downtown Oakland, at beautiful Preservation Park. Just off 12th Street, naturally you can get there from the 12th St. BART station. Those with limited ability can use the parking lot off of MLK Way; otherwise there should be plenty of FREE parking within the park and on surrounding streets.

Laurie speaks at 3:15, but remember our meetings start at 12, and include interactive groups to help you with your writing and your book sales. In our craft group, we discuss how to tackle challenges in our writing. In the marketing group we help you spread the word about your books and build your platform. We also provide tasty snacks and plenty of opportunities to network with other writers.

MEETING SCHEDULE

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group
2:00–2:30 – Break, Book Sale
2:30–3:00 – Announcements

Featured Speakers

3:00–3:15 – CWC Featured member
3:15–4:00 – Featured Speaker Laurie Ann Doyle

Meetings are $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

Sept 17th: How to Craft a Book that Sells, with Nina Amir

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ATTENTION: NEW VENUE! 

****We’ve moved! See below for our new location!****

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Our new meeting space, Preservation Park, is convenient to BART and 980, near downtown Oakland.

The average book today sells only about 250 copies per year and 3,000 in its lifetime. Improve your odds of becoming a successful author by producing a business plan for your book before you write a word. As you do, you develop an Author Attitude, craft a marketable book idea, and evaluate your idea and yourself through a publishing professional’s lens. You also develop a career plan to help you reach your goal: successful authorship.

 

At our September meeting, learn how to determine if your book is not only a great creative idea but also marketable product—a viable business venture. Go through the Author Training Process, the foundation for creating books that sell—to publishers and to readers! This nine-step evaluation tool helps you determine if your book is ready to go to market—to be shopped to agents, publishers or readers—and if you are ready to become an author.

(Based on Nina Amir’s book, The Author Training Manual, Writer’s Digest Books, March 2014.)

Session Takeaways:

  • Learn how to discover if your book idea is marketable.
  • Find out how to decide if you are cut out to write and market a successful book—if you are an attractive publishing partner or savvy indie publisher.
  • Discover what publishers and readers want.
  • Learn how to produce a successful book.
  • Take the nine steps in the “proposal process.
  • See through an acquisitions editor’s eyes.
  • Find out why you shouldn’t write your book as soon as you get the idea.
  • Learn how to be the business partner a publisher seeks.

About our Featured Speaker, Nina Amir

nina-amirNina Amir is an Amazon bestselling author of such books as How to Blog a Book, The Author Training Manual and Creative Visualization for Writers. She is known as the Inspiration to Creation Coach because she helps writers, bloggers and other creative people combine their passion and purpose so they move from idea to inspired action and achieve more inspired results.

Nina is a hybrid author who has self-published 17 books and had as many as 11 books on Amazon Top 100 lists and six on the same bestseller list (Authorship) at the same time.

As an Author Coach, some of her clients have sold 300,000+ copies of their books, landed deals with major publishing houses and created thriving businesses around their books. She is an international speaker and award-winning journalist and blogger as well as the founder of National Nonfiction Writing Month and the Nonfiction Writers’ University.

Find her at NinaAmir.com.

But That’s Not All!

Get Marketing Support, Get Your Craft Questions Answered, and Network with Other Writers…and Check Out Our New Location in the Heart of Oakland

We are meeting at Preservation Park

Our next meeting will be right off 980 in downtown Oakland, at beautiful Preservation Park. Just off 12th Street, naturally you can get there from the 12th St. BART station. Those with limited ability can use the parking lot off of MLK Way; otherwise there should be plenty of FREE parking within the park and on surrounding streets.

Nina Amir speaks at 3:15, but remember our meetings start at 12, and include interactive groups to help you with your writing and your book sales. In our craft group, we discuss how to tackle challenges in our writing. In the marketing group we help you spread the word about your books and build your platform. We also provide tasty snacks and plenty of opportunities to network with other writers.

MEETING SCHEDULE

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group

Simultaneously

12:30–2:00 – Social Hour
2:00–2:30 – Break, Book Sale
2:30–3:00 – Announcements

Featured Speakers

3:00–3:15 – CWC Featured  member Karma Bennett reads
3:15–4:30 – Featured Speaker Nina Amir

Meetings are $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

 

CWC Summer Social—July 23rd at Heinold’s

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There will be no statewide picnic in Joaquin Miller Park this year, our club’s original “home base,” but we will once again be holding an “open house” for all “California Writers.”

(That’s a lot of “quotation marks.” We writers sure know how to use our tools, don’t we?)

Join the Berkeley Branch of the California Writers Club at Jack London’s favorite hangout, Heinold’s First and Last Chance Saloon in Jack London Square, from 3:30-5:30pm on Sunday, July 23rd. No-host bar & lots and lots of writers.

We welcome all California Writers, and invite you to come and see if joining the club will benefit your writing career.

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P.S. Although this is an “open house,” Jack London’s cabin won’t actually be open but you can learn about this important founding member of our branch.

JUNE 18: How to Turn Your Book into an Audiobook with Howard Van Es

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how to turn your book into an audiobook (June 18th 109 3rd St Oakland)

Come to Our June 18th Meeting
Featuring Howard Van Es

Our June meeting will feature Howard Van Es, president of Let’s Write Books, Inc. His company helps authors with editing, design, publishing and book marketing services. He’s going to talk to us about audiobooks.

Turn Your Book Into an Audiobook

Howard VanEs

Howard Van Es will speak at our June 18th meeting on how to turn your book into an audiobook

The market for audiobooks is exploding due to the growing number of computers, smartphones, and tablets, which make it easy for the consumer to purchase and instantly listen to their favorite books. Interestingly, Amazon has seen this trend and purchased Audible a few years ago. They also own ACX, which is the major distributor of audiobooks to Amazon, Audible, and iTunes, the three big platforms for audiobook sales.

The digital platform is another way to easily repurpose the content of books while tapping into more channels of distribution, which means more people being exposed to your book resulting in more sales and royalty payments for you. Howard Van Es will show you how to turn your book into an audiobook and tap into this hot trend in book sales.

In addition to running his company, Van Es is also author of 30 books of his own and has ghostwritten many others for clients. He is also the former owner and creative director of an award winning advertising agency.

Find out more about Howard Van Es at LetsWriteBooks.net

But Wait, There’s More

Howard Van Es will speak at 3:15, but remember our meetings start at 12, and include interactive groups to help you with your writing and your book sales. In our craft group, we discuss how to tackle challenges in our writing. In the marketing group we help you spread the word about your books and build your platform. We also provide tasty snacks and plenty of opportunities to network with other writers.

Our June meeting will also be when we announce our new executive board. Find out who is going to be running the Berkeley CA Writers Club throughout 2017, what they have planned and how they will steer this ship.

MEETING SCHEDULE

12:00–1:00 – Craft Support Group
1:00–2:00 – Marketing Group

Simultaneously
12:30–2:00 – Social Hour
2:00–2:30 – Break, Book Sale
2:30–3:00 – Announcements & MEET THE NEW CWC EXECUTIVE BOARD!

Featured Speakers
3:00–3:15 – CWC Featured Member Joanne Ainsworth reads
3:15–4:30 – Featured Speaker Howard Van Es

Meetings are $5 for members, $10 for non-members.

Meeting Location: Jack London Park in Jack London Square

520 3rd Street, Oakland

One block east of Broadway. It’s a big brick building between third and fourth streets. Ring the buzzer to be let in, the code will be on a sign on the door.

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